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Keeping it short and sweet, but tasty this week:

The Domestic Man posted a wonderful recipe for Blaukraut (German Red Cabbage) last week and after all of that “beige” holiday food, I am ready to add color back into my life in the form of antioxidant-rich cabbage. This is an excellent foolproof and economical recipe that doesn’t require any special produce or pantry ingredients with the possible exception of cloves. The resulting recipe is a wonderful homey side dish that pairs very well with pork and wintery root mash of parsnips & cauliflower; if you can have white potatoes with no issue (some Paleo folks do indulge), I recommend using that in the root mash instead of cauliflower.

I will admit: I am not infallible. While I am able to navigate through most non-Paleo items without temptation, I do go weak over sour gummy candies or gelatin snacks. Thankfully, this is not something I contend with at home but the office is another story. They recently stocked up on some “healthy” fruit leather snacks (chock-a-block with corn syrup and canola oil) so to keep my cravings at bay, I plan to make a big batch of Balanced Bites’ sweet & sour gummy gelatin snacks to keep in the office refrigerator. These treats are an excellent way to get plenty of gut-healing and joint-soothing goodness by way of grassfed gelatin. I use the Great Lakes kosher gelatin (in the red canister) and I do lean towards the sour end of the recipe by swapping the 1/4 cup water for more lemon juice). I’ve successfully made “berry” versions of these gummies and now that they are out of season, I will test the quality of frozen berries and report back. These gummies do require a bit of trial and error to suit your palate (taste and texture-wise) but no matter how you tweak it, the end result is still delicious!

Thanks for your continued reading!

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Overwhelmed by Thanksgiving leftovers? Here are some tasty links to help you whittle away all that turkey:

Stupid Easy Paleo knocks the leftover game right out of the park with her recipe for a Paleo Thanksgiving leftovers sandwich. This delectable sandwich combines turkey with brussels sprouts, drizzled with cranberry sauce, and is sandwiched between two sweet potato latke-style buns. You can definitely tweak this recipe based around your leftovers: gravy instead of cranberry sauce; mashed potato or even stuffing pancakes instead of the grated latkes; the variations could go on forever.

If you prefer some lighter fare after the Thanksgiving indulgence, Martha Stewart offers a restorative turkey broth with chiles and tomatoes. This light soup uses the roasted turkey carcass to create a rich broth; the recipe as posted does not actually call for turkey meat but you could easily add it in to make a more substantial meal. Definitely do not skip the lime as the acidity brightens the flavors of the soup; you can serve it with additional wedges on the side.

Thanks for your continued reading!

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Something stinks… and it’s this week’s Tasty Treats:

Bone broth is a cornerstone of Paleo/Primal cooking as it is used in many different savory recipes or consumed with little embellishment as savory “healing” drink. Oh Hello Paleo talks about the surprisingly unpleasant result of making bone broth at home. But don’t let that smelly surprise deter you from making your own bone broth; with the holidays coming up, bone broth is an excellent culinary workhorse to have in your cooking arsenal (OHP uses it to great effect in a homemade beef stew).

Continuing down this smelly path of Primal/Paleo essentials, how about rendering tallow or lard? If you’ve familiarized yourself with Paleo, you know that the most people use almost every part of the animal, including the fat. Lard (pig) and tallow (cow) are excellent cooking fats but it can be difficult to find both from pasture-raised sources. The Paleo Parents posted a helpful guide to rendering suet into tallow. You may end up with more fat than you know what to do with… and interestingly enough, you can turn it into a beauty balm! This Paleo Life has an excellent DIY recipe for beef tallow skin lotion. I haven’t tried it yet but I am a sucker for all-natural beauty products, and what could be more primal than slathering your body with animal fat?

Thanks for your continued reading!

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Suddenly my sad scrambled eggs and sautéed broccoli “brinner” is looking even more pathetic after seeing Homegrown Paleo‘s Facebook post of the Fried Chicken Livers from Melissa Joulwan‘s newest cookbook Well Fed 2. Chicken liver is chock full of nutrients like iron, choline, and Vitamins A, B6 and B12, D, and K2… but nutrition aside, what Southerner can resist delicious fried chicken livers?!

Homegrown Paleo - Chicken Livers from Well Fed 2

The recipe is published in the paperback cookbook, which is available in stores nationwide and online. Now if you will pardon me, I need to wipe the drool off my keyboard and add chicken livers to my shopping list.

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A couple of weeks ago, I talked about the origins of most the grass-fed beef found in U.S. markets so it seems timely to visit the recent salmonella outbreak traced back to Foster Farms chicken products (via Storify). If there wasn’t a more compelling argument to buy your organic pasture-raised poultry from a local source, I don’t know what is.

If you can’t source your clean poultry locally, there is always U.S. Wellness Meats. With autumn finally making its way to North Texas, how about a comforting bowl of chicken soup made with their free-range chicken? Perfect for all skill levels and palates; use ghee in place of butter to make it Paleo compliant.

Thanks for your continued reading!

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In lieu of an introductory post, I wanted to share two different links from two sources on my blog roll to showcase the diversity of recipes in the Paleo-Primal food realm:

Russ Crandall of The Domestic Man showcases the humble collard green in a simple Brazilian recipe known as Couve a Mineira.  It is a traditional preparation that retains the beautiful vibrancy of the greens but will seem mostly unfamiliar to Americans, who are accustomed to stewing collards until the color drains out of the leaves.

If you are already nervous about saying goodbye to your usual sweet treats, do not fear: Michelle Tam at Nom Nom Paleo has your sweet tooth covered.  She shares a delicious-looking Chocolate Pie with Raw Graham Cracker Crust recipe from Kelly Brozyna’s new book, The Paleo Chocolate Lovers’ Cookbook.

I hope you enjoy these links I shared and stay tuned for more food content.

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